San Carlos Branch Library
Friends of the Library

San Carlos Branch Library
619-527-3430
7265 Jackson Dr
San Diego, CA 92119

Adult Programs Category

2018’s One Book, One San Diego Selection

 August 25, at the San Diego Union-Tribune sponsored Festival of Books, the 2018, “One Book, One San Diego,” selection was announced.  It is March: Book One.” This graphic memoir is the first of a trilogy,written by Congressman John Lewis, Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell.   "March: Book One, is a vivid first-hand account of the early life of the Civil Rights icon, John Lewis, including meeting Martin Luther King, Jr. and the birth of the Nashville Student Movement.  John Lewis and other... Continue Reading >

2017’s One Book, One San Diego Selection.

  KPBS and San Diego Public Library are proud to present The Sandcastle Girls by New York Times bestselling novelist Chris Bohjalian. The Sandcastle Girls is a multi-generational tale that spans nearly 100 years.  It is initially set in Syria during World War I and focuses on the Armenian Genocide. “These days it is very important for me to tell people that I am the grandson of two Middle Eastern immigrants,” Bohjalian said. “We are a nation of refugees and immigrants.... Continue Reading >

Feeling Fit Club

This program is not held at the San Carlos Branch Library. The San Diego Public Library system does not offer adult exercise classes, so we thought you might be interested in joining a FREE Feeling Fit Club, sponsored by the San Diego County, Health & Human Services, Aging & Independence Services. This free functional fitness class is intended for those 60+ years of age to improve mobility, strength, balance, and flexibility with the ultimate goal of maintaining independence and activities of... Continue Reading >

2016: “One Book, One San Diego Selection”

The 2016 One Book One San Diego selection is Waiting for Snow in Havana by National Book Award-winning author, Carlos Eire. Waiting for Snow in Havana is Carlos Eire’s beautiful, nostalgia-laced memoir of his childhood in Cuba, the country he left in 1962 at age 11. Using humor, magical realism and lyrical language, Eire paints a portrait of a childhood shattered forever by the Cuban Revolution. He was one of 14,000 Cuban children brought to the U.S. without their parents as... Continue Reading >